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“A California classic . . . California, it should be remembered, was very much the wild west, having to wait until 1850 before it could force its way into statehood. so what tamed it? Mr. Starr’s answer is a combination of great men, great ideas and great projects.”—The Economist

From the age of exploration to the age of Arnold, the Golden State’s premier historian distills the entire sweep of California’s history into one splendid volume. Kevin Starr covers it all: Spain’s conquest of the native peoples of California in the early sixteenth century and the chain of missions that helped that country exert control over the upper part of the territory; the discovery of gold in January 1848; the incredible wealth of the Big Four railroad tycoons; the devastating San Francisco earthquake of 1906; the emergence of Hollywood as the world’s entertainment capital and of Silicon Valley as the center of high-tech research and development; the role of labor, both organized and migrant, in key industries from agriculture to aerospace. In a rapid-fire epic of discovery, innovation, catastrophe, and triumph, Starr gathers together everything that is most important, most fascinating, and most revealing about our greatest state.

Praise for California

“[A] fast-paced and wide-ranging history . . . [Starr] accomplishes the feat with skill, grace and verve.” Los Angeles Times Book Review

“Kevin Starr is one of california’s greatest historians, and California is an invaluable contribution to our state’s record and lore.” —MarIa ShrIver, journalist and former First Lady of California

“A breeze to read.” San Francisco

Review

“Kevin Starr is one of California’s greatest historians, and California: A History is an invaluable contribution to our state''s record and lore.”
Maria Shriver, First Lady of California

“From Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo to Arnold Schwarzenegger, the Donner Party to the 1992 Los Angeles riots, Kevin Starr captures the fullness of California history in one sweeping and masterful narrative. Starr is not only the Golden State’s greatest living chronicler, he is also one of its greatest treasures.”
Gregory Rodríguez, senior fellow, New America Foundation, and contributing editor, Los Angeles Times

“I am honored to recommend California: A History, this perfect distillation of Kevin Starr’s life’s work. He is California’s most devoted lover and most passionate advocate, our patron saint. He transforms an already fascinating tale and imbues it with ineffable magic and grace.”
Carolyn See, author of Making a Literary Life

“There is no more knowledgeable or insightful historian of the California dream than Kevin Starr.”
Richard Rodríguez


“A magisterially authoritative survey of the movements–geological, political, scientific, artistic, and sociological–that have shaped California into the unique state it is today. This engrossing warts-and-all saga is told with a verve and panache that sweep the reader along.”
Michael York

About the Author

From 1994 to 2004 Kevin Starr served as State Librarian for California. He now teaches at the University of Southern California. His writings have earned him the National Medal of the Arts, the Centennial Medal of the Harvard Graduate School, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and election to the Society of American Historians.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

1
 
QUEEN CALAFIA’S ISLAND
 
Place and First People
 
First described in a bestseller, California entered history as a myth. In 1510 the Spanish writer Garci Ordóñez de Montalvo issued a sequel to his 1508 prose romance Amadis de Gaula, which Montalvo had in turn based upon a late thirteenth- to early fourteenth-century Portuguese narrative derived from French sources. Published in Seville, Montalvo’s Las Sergas de Esplandián (The Deeds of Esplandián) chronicled the exploits of Esplandián, son of the hero Amadis of Gaul, at the siege of Constantinople. Among Esplandián’s allies at the siege were the Californians, a race of black Amazons under the command of Queen Calafia. California itself, according to Montalvo, was “an island on the right hand of the Indies . . . very close to the side of the Terrestrial Paradise,” abounding in gold and precious stones. The Californians rode griffins into battle and fought with golden weapons. Queen Calafia herself was “very large in person, the most beautiful of all of them, of blooming years, and in her thoughts desirous of achieving great things, strong of limb and of great courage.”
 
Equipping a fleet, Calafia had sailed to Constantinople to join the other great captains of the world in the siege against the Turks. By the end of the story, Queen Calafia and the Californians have become Christians (which involved, one surmises, giving up their promiscuous ways and the feeding of their male offspring to their griffins), and Calafia herself marries one of Esplandián’s trusted lieutenants, with whom she goes on to further adventures.
 
In 1863 the Boston antiquarian Edward Everett Hale, author of the well-known short story “The Man Without a Country,” sent a paper to the American Antiquarian Society in which he provided translations of key passages of Las Sergas de Esplandián and cited the prose romance as the source of the name “California.” Hale’s report was in turn reported on by The Atlantic Monthly in March 1864. Montalvo’s two tales, Hale noted, were instant bestsellers and remained so for the rest of the sixteenth century. Not until the publication of Don Quixote de la Mancha by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra in two parts in 1605 and 1615 were Montalvo’s romances superseded in popularity. Don Quixote, furthermore, was not the only one to take these stories as literal fact. The Spanish in general had a tendency to conflate fact with fiction when it came to these prose romances.
 
In 1533 a party of Spanish explorers, sailing west from Mexico across an unnamed sea at the command of Hernán Cortés, conqueror of Mexico, landed on what they believed to be an island in the recently discovered Pacific. After 1539 they began to call the place after the mythic island of California, half believing and more than fully hoping they would find there as well the gold and precious stones described in Montalvo’s romance, and perhaps even an Amazon or two. Not until 1539–40 did the Spanish discover their geographical mistake. California was a peninsula, not an island, and north of this peninsula—eventually called Antigua or Old California—was a vast northern region that the Spaniards, for one reason or another, would be unable to settle for another 230 years.
 
The American state of California faces the Pacific Ocean between latitude 42 degrees north (at the border of the American state of Oregon) and latitude 32 degrees north (at the border of the Mexican state of Baja California Norte). On a clear day, photographed from a satellite, California appears as a serene palette of blue, green, brown, white, and red. This apparent serenity, however, masks a titanic drama occurring beneath the surface, in the clash of the two tectonic plates upon which California rests. California itself resulted from a collision of the North American and Pacific plates. Across a hundred million years, the grinding and regrinding of these plates against each other, their sudden detachments, their thrusts above or below each other—together with the lava flow of volcanoes, the bulldozing action of glaciers, and, later, the flow of water and the depositing of alluvial soil—created a region almost abstract in its distinct arrangements of mountain, valley, canyon, coastline, plain, and desert. As the California-born philosopher and historian Josiah Royce observed, there is nothing subtle about the landforms and landscapes of California. Everything is scaled in bold and heroic arrangements that are easily understood.
 
Fronting more than half the shoreline of the western continental United States, California—all 158,693 square miles of it—offers clear-cut and confrontational topographies. First of all, there is the 1,264-mile Pacific shoreline itself. Thirty million years ago, tectonic action formed this shoreline by detaching a great land mass from the southern edge of the Baja California peninsula, moving it northward, and attaching it back onto the continent. At four strategic intervals—the bay of San Diego in the south, Monterey and San Francisco bays in the midregion, and Humboldt Bay in the north—this appended land mass opened itself to the sea and created four harbors. Formed as recently as thirty thousand years ago when mountains on the shoreline collapsed and the sea rushed in, San Francisco Bay is among the two or three finest natural harbors on the planet.
 
Rising from this coastline, from north to south, various mountain ranges run boldly into the Pacific. At latitude 35 degrees 30 minutes north, in the county of San Luis Obispo, these coastal mountains bifurcate into two ranges: the Transverse Ranges, veering in a southeasterly direction into southern Kern County in the interior, and the Peninsula Ranges, continuing southward down the coast. In the far north, the Klamath Mountains and the southern tip of the Cascades move in an easterly direction toward the Modoc Plateau on the northeastern corner. Running south from the Modoc Plateau is another, even more formidable mountain range, the Sierra Nevada—John Muir’s “Range of Light,” four hundred miles long, eighty miles wide—sealing off the eastern edge of California from the Great Basin until these mighty mountains yield to the Mojave Desert in
 
the southeastern corner. Forty-one California mountains rise to more than ten thousand feet. The highest—Mount Whitney—is, at 14,496 feet, the second highest mountain in the continental United States. Mount Shasta in the north—rising from its plain to a height of 14,162 feet, its crowning glaciers still grinding against each other—was once an active volcano. Nearby Mount Lassen, also a volcano, was active as recently as 1921.
 
Thus in eons past did mountains set the stage for the essential drama of the California landscape: an interplay of heights, flatland, and coast. Coastal plains adjoin the bays of San Francisco and Monterey, and a great basin, the Los Angeles Plain, flanks the coast south of the Transverse Ranges. Four hundred and thirty miles in length, the Central Valley runs through the center of the state in two sequences, the San Joaquin Valley to the south, the Sacramento Valley to the north. Open and sweeping as well are the moonlike Modoc Plateau in the northeastern corner of the state, the high desert Great Basin on the eastern edge of the Sierra Nevada, the Mojave Desert in the southeast, and the Salton Trough thrusting itself up from Baja.
 
Here it is, then: a landscape of stark contrasts, vibrant and volatile with the geological forces that shaped the western edge of the continent. Numerous fault lines—the San Andreas, the Hayward, the Garlock, the San Jacinto, the Nacimiento—crisscross the western edge from San Francisco Bay to the Mexican border, keeping the region alive with tectonic action. Within human memory—in 1857 at the Tejon Pass in Southern California, in 1872 in the Owens Valley, in San Francisco in 1906, in Long Beach in 1933, in the San Fernando Valley in 1971, again in the San Francisco Bay Area in 1989, and again in the San Fernando Valley in 1994—great earthquakes shook the land, destroying lives and property. At magnitude 8.3 on the Richter scale, the San Francisco earthquake of April 18, 1906, like the Lisbon earthquake of 1775, precipitated the destruction of an entire city.
 

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4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

D. Delgardo
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Like Coming Home Again - "California - A History" is a warm and gentle retelling of the state''s great story.
Reviewed in the United States on February 18, 2017
As a school principal I recall dropping by an eighth grade teacher’s history class the first day of school one year. I remember him offering this sage comment to his charges: “The thing about history is that it’s a story well told.” Surely that thought didn’t originate... See more
As a school principal I recall dropping by an eighth grade teacher’s history class the first day of school one year. I remember him offering this sage comment to his charges: “The thing about history is that it’s a story well told.” Surely that thought didn’t originate with him, but it stuck with me.

The story of California, from its geomorphic origins to its ranking as the sixth or seventh largest economy in the world is both dramatic and sublime. It is expansive and illustrative of histories everywhere. Decades back, I recall telling my fourth grade students that any kind of event that has happened in human history has happened in California. Mount Vesuvius’s eruption in Italy? Mount Lassen erupted here. Overthrow of the British by the colonists in the 1770s? The Bear Flag Revolt in 1846 tossed out a distant Mexican regime. The subjugation and massacre of Native Americans in the Great Plains? We have the Modoc War (in which the only Cavalry officer having risen to the rank of General was killed.) Earthquakes in Alaska or Japan? Reference shifts in our San Andreas fault and many of its cousins. Engineering feats like Egypt’s Aswan High Dam? Ours are at Shasta and Oroville – and at the Golden Gate.

Then there are the events that have occurred or industries that originated only in place like California: The titanic rail crossing of the Sierra, the birth of the motion picture industry in Hollywood, the dawn of aero space, Disney, Apple, Tesla.

I used to tell kids they could almost walk out their back door and step into some aspect California’s history or at, least find something within and hour or so from home if Mom or Dad would drive ‘em. We live in a wonderful state.

Few people have told the story of California better than former state librarian Kevin Starr. I purchased a copy of California: A History the other day having read that Mr. Starr passed away a week ago. My previous copy had somehow wandered off.

Rereading Starr’s work, I am reintroduced to the names and places – and the names that have become places – that I’ve enjoyed touring over the course of my explorations. Mr. Starr makes me want to revisit the route of the Old Spanish Trail as well as the Applegate. I want to again see Monterey’s presidio and the site of our state capitol in Benicia. I need to see the Mount Wilson observatory and find my grand dad’s resting sport at Forest Lawn. I want to shake hands with Fremont and Carson and Bidwell and Arnold Schwarzenegger.

Kevin Starr’s well-told story of California makes me want to do all these things. Reading like an action/adventure novel in places, his history has proven to be both a pleasant departure from current events and a bit of an explanation of them.
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Erika
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Reading this book has exhausted me and I''m generally a very good reader of what others consider to be dull materials
Reviewed in the United States on November 2, 2017
This book has a lot of comprehensive information about California history but as others have mentioned it is extremely dry. Reading this book has exhausted me and I''m generally a very good reader of what others consider to be dull materials. Along with the helpful... See more
This book has a lot of comprehensive information about California history but as others have mentioned it is extremely dry. Reading this book has exhausted me and I''m generally a very good reader of what others consider to be dull materials. Along with the helpful information I feel that the author includes too many irrelevant details and asides about historical figures that he only mentions once. All in all though it is a nice over view I would prefer a more in-depth analysis of each topic. I feel like too much is glossed over so nothing really creates much of a lasting impression. This book has throughly irritated me if I''m being honest.
17 people found this helpful
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Timothy J. Mcgraw
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
First 100 pages good, next 100 pages total Democrat Pro Identity Politics. Now in Trash
Reviewed in the United States on September 16, 2020
Page 118: "Moving ties and rails, pounding spikes with a force that seemed to explode from their muscular bodies." Starr regarding Chinese laborers building RR through Sierra. That sentence had me bursting into laughter. But Starr gets the dates right and the main... See more
Page 118: "Moving ties and rails, pounding spikes with a force that seemed to explode from their muscular bodies." Starr regarding Chinese laborers building RR through Sierra. That sentence had me bursting into laughter. But Starr gets the dates right and the main characters. He also mentions the money, racism, lynchings, environmental destruction, theft, killings, lies, slavery, missionaries, and all around just plain greed that led to the founding of California. It''s worth reading, if irritating at times as Erika wrote in her review.
At about page 200 I finally had had enough of Starr''s run on sentences. I''d had enough of his academic looking down his nose at everyone, but his academic ancestors.
In the trash...
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Brian Lewis
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Historical Summary
Reviewed in the United States on June 8, 2020
This is a summation of Kevin Starr''s seven history of California and the American Dream, generally regarded as the definitive history of California. I have not read the series, but was hoping to get some insight into the Golden State, to which I moved about two years... See more
This is a summation of Kevin Starr''s seven history of California and the American Dream, generally regarded as the definitive history of California. I have not read the series, but was hoping to get some insight into the Golden State, to which I moved about two years ago.

Starr certainly covered a great deal of ground in this book, which is after all, a distillation of his life''s work. It is hard not to applaud the effort, but I have to confess to being bored throughout reading it. Long sentences, long paragraphs. It felt very text book like. (I suppose it is a text book, somewhere, likely at a university level.)
4 people found this helpful
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William J. Trinkle
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
CALIFORNIA: A Grand Subject Made Enjoyably Graspable.
Reviewed in the United States on September 30, 2015
I just finished this book and really enjoyed its rollercoaster ride through California history. Starr has a good sense of how to contextualize topics that helps one see California from many views. As an example, he takes California''s labor and union history starting with... See more
I just finished this book and really enjoyed its rollercoaster ride through California history. Starr has a good sense of how to contextualize topics that helps one see California from many views. As an example, he takes California''s labor and union history starting with its earliest days up to near modern times, all in a swoop, but in a way that helps one better understsand both labor and union and California. He does similar journeys for other topics like California art and literature. Sometimes California can be such a grand topic that it is hard to grasp its true shape and contours. Starr does an excellent job of giving one person''s summary of it, and helps to make the subject more easily graspable. It may not be for everyone, but I recommend Starr''s California
6 people found this helpful
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Lorin C
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Detailed account of California''s founding
Reviewed in the United States on December 12, 2019
The book appears to be very factual albeit the author seems to have a liberal slant. As a lifetime resident of California I constantly hear Mexicans say we stole it from them. Page 73 clearly states that the USA paid Mexico $18.25 million for the state. Pretty good sum... See more
The book appears to be very factual albeit the author seems to have a liberal slant. As a lifetime resident of California I constantly hear Mexicans say we stole it from them. Page 73 clearly states that the USA paid Mexico $18.25 million for the state. Pretty good sum in 1848. The Mexican president signed the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo ceding to the USA all territories North of the Rio Grande.
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Christopher Prentiss
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Ambitious and Satisfying...nearly excellent
Reviewed in the United States on April 1, 2006
Kevin Starr takes on the history of California in one volume, and in around 350 pages no less. Having grown up in Alabama, a history of that state, though it is more than twice as old would be possible in a one-volume format, but with the cultural, economic, political, and... See more
Kevin Starr takes on the history of California in one volume, and in around 350 pages no less. Having grown up in Alabama, a history of that state, though it is more than twice as old would be possible in a one-volume format, but with the cultural, economic, political, and geographic importance of a place like California, trying to pull off a genuine history in these confines seems a bit foolhardy. However, keeping the nature of the project in mind (a true history could easily fill 3-5 volumes ) Kevin Starr accomplishes a satisfying feat. With an economy of words and a non-linear manner of telling the story of California, Starr draws the reader into his admiration and love of, and appropirate criticism of his great state.

The early history seems to be adequate. One of course could spend many chapters on the exploration of the state and its early governance, but he wisely navigates this era with a concise pen. However, as is true of the rest of the book, there are no footnotes (I have no idea why he chose to forgoe citations of this sort), so there is no direction for the reader who would like to delve deeper into a particular period. And it seems to me that though there is a short bibliography at the end, forgoing footnotes or endnotes intimates that every fact has been uncovered by and is original to the writer.

As the book chronicles the modern period, there is continuing attention paid to the racial makeup of the state, the development and challenges of the economy and politics, and the state''s unique shaping influence on the cultural landscape of the US (what happens in California happens in the Midwest years later.) But, the history is essentially binary; throughout the entire book and particularly in this modern period, one would think that the story of California is largely the story of Los Angeles and the San Francisco Bay Area. San Diego for example has probably 1/10th of the page numbers in the index as the SF Bay Area and San Francisco itself. And though Sacramento obviously casts less ubiquitous shadow on the state than do other state capitals, its story is largely lost in Starr''s treatment. The Central Valley, though present in the book indirectly because of the political movements of organized labor and the various implications of the number of undocumented workers employed there, is never adequately distinguished from the urban centers nor contrasted in such a way that the reader gets a feel for it as a place.

However, though possessing these faults, the book is a worthy achievement. In fact the last two chapters: Ecumenopolis and Arnold are worth the price of the book. As an overview of the cultural and ethnic makeup of the state (Ecumenopolis) and the challenge of governance (Arnold) these chapters are really more like essays on the nature of California itself, and are simply brilliant. Here Starr considers the future implications of a population which is uniquely heterogenous, deeply divided politically and culturally, and is a primary engine of commerce and political and cultural discourse for the entire nation. What will come of 60 million people (by 2040) whose worldview and daily experiences are so very different from the majority of Americans. If it is true that the America needs California, does California really need America.

In the sense of a "bottom-line" review, I read California as a newcomer to the state who was wanting to find a fairly compact volume to read as an introduction to the people and places of my new home. If the scope of this book is kept in mind, this book is extremely well done and worth the money and time invested.
7 people found this helpful
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gk1
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent Book in California
Reviewed in the United States on December 4, 2019
This is my first book on comprehensive history of California. I especially enjoyed the last 1/3 of the book since it was more recent events.
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Top reviews from other countries

Andrew Campbell Halavais
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not interesting, not informative, and many chapters just seem like lists of names.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 29, 2013
I got this book hoping to learn something new about the history of California. I didn''t. The book obviously has a very wide scope as it hopes to address the entire history of California. It starts by basically skipping any sort of natural geographical history, which is...See more
I got this book hoping to learn something new about the history of California. I didn''t. The book obviously has a very wide scope as it hopes to address the entire history of California. It starts by basically skipping any sort of natural geographical history, which is excusable. Then it dedicates a few paragraphs to pre-Columbian Californian civilizations. It shoots through a couple hundred years of Spanish and Mexican rule with a mention that Russians and Chinese also came. Basically through 1900 it covers no more than is presented in American High Schools and all information which is presented in the context of the history of the entire USA, not world history, not history of the Americas, and not history in the small focus of California alone. It then dedicates roughly a third of the book to the history of organized labor and its oppression in California. Then it does all California art between 1900 and 1980, including the movie and music industry in one chapter. I had hoped to encounter a number of amusing anecdotes and fascinating characters. When the text was immediately dry and dull, I had hoped trudging through it would at least provide some better understanding of the various social and cultural changes and structures that evolved in California and how they relate to the state today. Neither of these were in this book. The one point which really made me decide to put in a negative review is the fact that there are so many points in the book where it just lists off names of notable people. There is no attempt to weave a narrative or even establish central themes in which to evaluate the historical events. The time invested in this book would be better spent with one history of San Francisco, one of Los Angeles, one of San Diego, one on the Gold Rush and another on John Muir. It''s a shame there doesn''t seem to be a good general history of California but this is certainly not that.
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Amazon Customer
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A textbook that reads well?
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 31, 2020
For a textbook, it''s quite an easy read with a lot of interesting anecdotes. The history of California in general is fascinating! Starr also attempts to be as impartial as possible.
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Marts
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Good Start
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 3, 2014
I came to this book in order to give me a background to the state, as am intending on visiting later in the year. It did fulfill that purpose, but only just. The first part was interesting, by way of its description of the colonisation of California. However it did seem to...See more
I came to this book in order to give me a background to the state, as am intending on visiting later in the year. It did fulfill that purpose, but only just. The first part was interesting, by way of its description of the colonisation of California. However it did seem to be pretty quick paced and I wonder if there was scope for greater discussion of themes and arguments etc. I struggled with the second half and its analysis of cultural developments, chapters at times seemed to just be lists and it was not an easy read. A good introduction which requires some perseverance in places.
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Alice Clayton
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book for anyone looking for a general history of ...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 10, 2016
Great book for anyone looking for a general history of the Golden State. Has served me well during my degree
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M. Campbell
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A wonderful canter through the origin and history of California
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 29, 2014
A wonderful canter through the origin and history of California. Beautifully written by a Master of his craft. Unable to put it down !
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popular California: new arrival A wholesale History (Modern Library Chronicles) sale

popular California: new arrival A wholesale History (Modern Library Chronicles) sale

popular California: new arrival A wholesale History (Modern Library Chronicles) sale

popular California: new arrival A wholesale History (Modern Library Chronicles) sale

popular California: new arrival A wholesale History (Modern Library Chronicles) sale

popular California: new arrival A wholesale History (Modern Library Chronicles) sale

popular California: new arrival A wholesale History (Modern Library Chronicles) sale

popular California: new arrival A wholesale History (Modern Library Chronicles) sale

popular California: new arrival A wholesale History (Modern Library Chronicles) sale

popular California: new arrival A wholesale History (Modern Library Chronicles) sale

popular California: new arrival A wholesale History (Modern Library Chronicles) sale